What's New

Choosing A Telescope

Telescope Aperture Considerations

Astronomical Sketches

Introduction to Planetary Sketching

Visual Observations

Refractor Dobsonian Style Mounts

Equipment Reviews

Favorite Quotes

The Bonds: Pioneers of American Astronomy

Saturn's Encke Minima and Encke Division

Nature and Travel Photography

Astrophotography

Astronomy Humor

Glossary

Recommended Astronomy Books

Links

Here are some of the aurora and lunar eclipse astrophotographs I have taken over the years.


Total Lunar Eclipse August 17th, 1989

Astro-Physics (AP) 7" f/9 on AP 706 equatorial mount. Exposure 20 seconds on ASA 400 speed film using an Olympus OM-1 camera.

Total Lunar Eclipse November 8th, 2003

Astro-Physics (AP) 7.1" f/9 on AP 800 equatorial mount. Exposure 12 seconds on ASA 400 speed film using an Olympus OM-1 camera.


Aurora display February 8th, 1986

This was the first aurora display that I observed. The display had been visible at the zenith after sunset, but by the time I learned about it was becoming less active and visible in the north northeastern sky near Cassiopeia.

Exposure 55 seconds on ASA 160 film using an Olympus OM-1 camera and Tokina 24mm lens set at 24mm at f/2.5.


Aurora display March 13th, 1989

This was the most intense aurora display that I have ever observed. It was so strong that it was visible even with the Moon only one day from first quarter phase, and it was visible through mid-level clouds. The bright moonlight caused some of my photographs to be overexposed.

The photograph above shows a large red column that was visible through the clouds in the northwestern sky.

Exposure 45 seconds on ASA 100 film using an Olympus OM-1 camera and Tokina 24mm lens set at 24mm at f/2.5.

The photograph above shows shimmering curtains of aurora in the northern sky with Ursa Major in the middle.

At its peak the aurora was visible virtually over the entire sky, including overhead at the zenith.


Aurora display October 30th, 2003

This aurora display became visible shortly after dusk, and at first showed subtle greens, reds, and blues that extended from the north, north east, north west, zenith, and south. These photographs were taken when it became more active and the red color became more pronounced.

The above view is facing to the northwest. In this photograph the stars that make up the Summer Triangle, Altair (on the left hand side of the photograph), Deneb in Cygnus (on the upper center of the photograph), and Vega in Lyra (lower center of the photograph) are visible.

Exposure 45 seconds on ASA 400 film using an Olympus OM-1 camera and Tokina 24mm - 40mm lens set at 24mm at f/2.8.

View is facing to the north. Ursa Minor is visible near the center of the photograph.

Exposure 55 seconds on ASA 400 film using an Olympus OM-1 camera and Tokina 24mm - 40mm lens set at 24mm at f/2.8.

View is looking overhead when the aurora was at the zenith and extended to the northwest and northeast. This was at the peak of the aurora display and many of the fainter stars were not visible through the aurora.

Exposure 60 seconds on ASA 400 film using an Olympus OM-1 camera and Tokina 17mm lens set at f/3.5.



All Photographs 2000-2015, Eric Jamison, all rights reserved. May not be used without written permission.

Home